Longing and Forgetting

http://www.surrey.ca/culture-recreation/14522.aspx
http://www.surrey.ca/culture-recreation/14522.aspx
Video characters inhabit the west wall of Chuck Bailey, climbing the wall, sitting on window ledges, and looking out towards the passing SkyTrain in Matthew Gingold, Thecla Schiphorst, and Philippe Pasquier’s new artwork. – See more at: http://www.surrey.ca/culture-recreation/14522.aspx#sthash.JFmYuXtz.dpuf

Longing and Forgetting is an outcome of research that explores how movement can be used more expressively and intelligently within interactive technologies.

The artists gratefully acknowledge the support of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (Moving Stories and Mobile Presence), CANARIE (m+m: movement + meaning middleware), and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council.

– See more at: http://www.surrey.ca/culture-recreation/14522.aspx#sthash.JFmYuXtz.dpuf

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Illusion of Togetherness

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This project investigates how audience’s process of perception affects their experience of connection with a performer in a mixed reality environment. The audience’s own kinesthetic perception may be viewed as an integral part of their communication with the performer. The increased use of media on stage has challenged the audience’s positioning in relation to the performer, both physically and conceptually  but requires further refinement . We believe that an understanding of the audience-performer connection can support the development of a poetics of reception for the use of media on stage. We present a performance-based study designed to give audience members a heightened awareness of their perception with an emphasis on the motion happening in the space behind them: their ‘back-space’. Through this study we bring insight into the relationship between the audience’s experience of perception and their perceived connection to a performer.

Corness, G., Carlson, K., Schiphorst, T. (2011) ‘Audience Empathy: A Phenomenological Method for Mediated Performance’, The 8th ACM Conference on Creativity and Cognition, In Press. Nominated for an Emma Award for Best Contribution to Creative Communication.

Distancing

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Distancing is an installation by Erin Ashenhurst and Kristin Carlson that plays with the themes of memory and narrative. To remember is to give meaning to personal experience. Over time, the nature of memories change as they fall subject to the filter of perspective, new information, and the process of forgetting. Photographs become documentation, creating a sense that the details of an experience are fixed and knowable.

In Distancing (2009), the viewer is presented with the projection of an image that could be read as a family photograph. By entering into close proximity with the projection, the viewer triggers the animation of the image and becomes a participant in the installation. As the image reveals itself to be a video, subtle changes in content begin to occur. Expressions fade and shift, forcing the participant to rebuild any speculative narrative they’ve developed to explain the visual content. By changing their distance from the screen, the participant can move through the series of images, exploring alternate truths and constructions.

http://vimeo.com/8417106